Chickpea Curry

Recently I started watching the Andy Warhol documentary on Netflix as I am a fan of art even though I know very little about it. During Warhol’s life he was a very private person and no one knew much about him but after his death his diaries were found, edited and published (they’re winging their way to me as we speak). What I really loved in the first episode is that the editor of his diaries said that some of the people he had written about resented what he’d said about them but she said this diary is Warhol’s narrative, if you want to tell your own narrative, write your own diary. Other people can disagree with you, but they can’t invalidate your opinions, your feelings are your own. So, in summary, don’t piss me off because I can totally write about you here, it’s my narrative :P. The documentary uses David Bowie’s ‘Andy Warhol’ song to open which is quite funny because for one, Andy Warhol didn’t like David Bowie. Also, David Bowie did idolise Warhol but despite that, you could hardly call his song flattering with lyrics such as ‘Andy Warhol, looks a scream, hang him on my wall. Andy Warhol, Silver Screen, can’t tell them apart at all’.

Here is another chickpea curry recipe that I found on BBC Good Food. It did have eggs but I didn’t so it’s eggless but feel free to add eggs or whatever kind of protein you like.

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp ghee
  • 1 onion
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 3 cm ginger
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 450g tomatoes
  • 1 tin chickpeas
  • 200g spinach
  • 3 tbsp plain yoghurt
  • 1/2 tsp chilli flakes
  • 10g coriander leaves
  • rice to serve

Method

1.) Peel and finely chop the onion. Melt some ghee in a large pan and add the onion. Cook for 10 minutes until the onion is soft.

2.) Whilst this is cooking, put some rice in another pan with some boiling water and cook on a low heat. Peel and finely dice the garlic. Slice off the ginger skin and grate the ginger. Chop up the tomatoes.

3.) Add the garlic, ginger, spices, chilli flakes and tomatoes to the pan and fry for a couple of minutes.

4.) Drain the tin of chickpeas and add the chickpeas to the pan with 100ml water. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook for 25 minutes.

5.) Chop up the coriander leaves whilst this is cooking.

6.) Once this has finished, remove the lid and add the spinach, Cook for 3 more minutes until the leaves have wilted.

7.) Stir through the yoghurt and sprinkle over the coriander leaves. Serve with the rice.

Chickpea, Peanut Butter Curry

Unlike the baos, this is definitely a meal you can make on a weeknight. I can personally vouch for it being a satisfying post gym supper. The peanut butter and the chickpeas will fulfil all your protein needs. A much better idea than Brittany’s on the Apprentice – ‘alcoholic protein drinks’ The horror. The recipe was on BBC Good Food.

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • oil
  • 1 onion
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 2.5cm ginger
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 2 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp fenugreek
  • 1 tin chickpeas
  • 300ml vegetable stock
  • 2 tbsp peanut butter (or almond butter)
  • 200g spinach
  • 150g rice

Method

1.) Put the rice on to cook

2.) Peel and dice the onion.

3.) Heat the oil and add the onion. Cook for 7 minutes.

4.) Whilst this is cooking, peel and dice the garlic. Peel and grate the ginger.

5.) In a small bowl, add all the spices with 2 tbsp water and stir to make a paste.

6.) Add the garlic and ginger to the onion and fry for one more minute.

7.) Add the paste to the pan and fry for 5 more minutes. Make up the stock.

8.) Stir in the chickpeas then add the stock. Cook for 5 minutes.

9.) Add the peanut butter and stir then add the spinach. Leave for a few minutes until the spinach is wilted.

10.) Serve with the rice.

Punjabi Chole

I made this tasty chickpea dish which was a lunch dish in Shelina Permaloo’s ‘Sunshine Diet’ as a side to some pan fried seabass and stuck in a bit of kale that I had leftover in the fridge. Ignore the state of the seabass. I used the hottest hob as the other back one was taken. It’s a nice quick midweek meal. A must if you stupidly took up an accountancy qualification that requires 40 hours of continuing professional development a year. I can only hope they will accept my reading of ‘Fintech for Dummies’ as relevant experience to my job. Buy pre-made minced garlic and ginger like me if you want to save some time.

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 onion
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 5cm piece ginger
  • 2 green chillies
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 2 tomatoes
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tin chickpeas
  • 2 tbsp coriander leaves
  • salt

Method

1.) Peel the onion and finely dice.

2.) Heat the oil in a pan and add the onion.

3.) Peel the garlic and ginger and finely chop along with the chillies.

4.) Add them to the pan with the cinnamon stick and cook on a low heat for another 3 minutes.

5.) In the meantime, measure out 100ml water and dice the tomatoes.

6.) Add the tomatoes and spices to the pan and cook for a couple more minutes.

7.) Add the water to the pan. Drain the chickpeas and add to the pan. Cook for 5 more minutes on a simmer until starting to thicken. Whilst this is thickening, chop up the coriander leaves.

8.) Discard the cinnamon stick, season with salt, sprinkle over the coriander and serve.

Indian Porridge (Uppma)

I’ve been meaning to post this recipe on the blog because I really like it. I made it for the first time just before I started writing the blog and enjoyed it just as much second time around. It’s nearly one year since I started blogging, I can’t believe it as not much has happened. I’ve just had my Spotify wrapped and I’m still just stanning on Paramore, David Bowie and The Beatles despite being in the top 5% of listeners in the UK. I had some refresher driving lessons this year after not driving for several years. The instructor managed to insult me twice in the last lesson by making a derogatory comment about cats and then remembering my career wrong as being within HR. No insult to those out there that work in HR but I don’t think he would have plucked out that one out of thin air if I were a guy. I’m a chartered certified accountant thank you very much. Other things that have happened in the year, I’ve been studying French, I am now able to read JK Rowling’s ‘The Christmas Pig’ in French but Harry Potter is still a bit beyond me without the help of a dictionary. I made my reading challenge for the year (30 books), some of them were definitely on work time. I’ve also managed to crochet my first half decent amigurumi so now my office Secret Santa will be getting a mini desk cactus (well the theme is shop local and you don’t get more local than homemade).

Now away from my exciting year and back to the recipe. In the book ‘Simple Spice Vegetarian’ this is a breakfast dish. It might be a bit out there for Westerners to have curried porridge for breakfast. Personally I did enjoy the savoury breakfasts in Japan of miso soup with fish but I will eat anything at any time of day. I ate this porridge as a delicious dinner. It was a great comforting meal to enjoy after recovering from a killer cold. You can really mix it up with whatever veg you want to add.

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 10 – 12 tbsp oats
  • oil
  • 1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
  • 150g red lentils
  • 1/2 heaped tsp cumin seeds
  • 6 – 8 curry leaves
  • 5 cm ginger
  • 1 onion
  • 1 carrot
  • 200g cubes squash/sweet potato
  • salt
  • 700ml stock

Method

1.) Preheat the oven to 200 degrees C

2.) Line a baking tray and spread out the cubes of squash

3.) Bake for 20 – 25 minutes until soft

4.) In the meantime, peel the onion and finely chop. Peel and grate the ginger. Peel and cube the carrot.

5.) In a casserole dish, heat to a low temperature, add the oats and toast gently until they start to be fragrant.

6.) Tip them out into a mixing bowl.

7.) Heat some oil and add the mustard seeds. Heat until they start to pop.

8.) Add the lentils and cumin seeds and cook for another couple of minutes.

9.) Add the curry leaves and sauté for a few seconds.

10.) Add the onion and carrot and cook for a few minutes until they start to soften. In the meantime, make up the stock.

11.) Add the oats to the dish and then add the stock. Cook on a low heat for about 15 – 20 minutes until it reaches a nice thick porridge consistency. Season with salt.

Saag Paneer

You may have noticed a bit of a gap on the blog, I was a little behind on posting but with this recipe I will be caught up to at least before I came back from holiday (4 days ago) – woo! I took this saag paneer recipe from Bosh – ‘Healthy Vegan’ and brutalised it into being vegetarian again. The vegan version uses tofu with nutritional yeast and miso which does sound interesting and probably would have been better than the paneer I bought from Sainsburys which turned out to be the feta textured kind which doesn’t fry properly (the halloumi textured kind that M&S sell is much better).

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 250 paneer
  • 2 tbsp ghee
  • 1 onion
  • 5cm ginger
  • 2 tomatoes (actually I forgot to buy these or Sainsburys forgot to deliver so I switched with some asparagus – very Indian I know!)
  • 500g spinach
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 2 tsp garam masala
  • 1/2 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp chilli flakes
  • 2 tbsp cream
  • salt and pepper
  • 2 rotis

Method

1.) Chop the paneer into cubes

2.) Prepare a plate with 2 pieces of kitchen roll on it

3.) Melt 1tbsp of the ghee in a frying pan, add the paneer and fry until golden brown, turning around to catch all the sides.

4.) Remove the paneer from the pan and place on top of the kitchen roll. Press down with another piece of kitchen roll to remove the excess oil.

5.) Peel and dice the onion, ginger and garlic. Dice the tomatoes.

6.) Melt the other tbsp ghee in the pan, add the cumin seeds and cook for 30 seconds. Add the onion and cook until soft. Add the garlic and ginger and cook for 1 minute. Add the garam masala, turmeric and chilli and stir for 30 seconds. Add the tomatoes and cook down for 4 minutes.

7.) Add the spinach and leave it to wilt for 2 minutes. Take off the heat and add the cream. Season with salt and pepper.

8.) Stir through the paneer and serve with a roti.

Coconut Dhal with paneer

Though I’ve already posted a recipe for dhal on this website, the first Tarka Dhal recipe was more gently spiced whereas this one is more of a flavour hit round the chops reminiscent to a curry. This one also you do in the slow-cooker. I served it with paneer which I crisped up in some ghee but I think if you can’t find paneer maybe halloumi would be a good swap though it is a little bit salty. The recipe is also easily made vegan by subbing the ghee for oil. Change the paneer for quorn or serve with a roti instead. This recipe was in Libby Silbermann’s ‘Vegetarian Slow Cooker’. I find most slow-cooker recipes are slow cooking meat and not really substitutable so this is a useful book for me. Things are just getting back to normal in the UK so I was really pleased with how this meal came out whilst waiting for an opportunity to dine out at the Tiffin Room in Manchester (also partly due to watching about 80% of the Euro 2020 tournament on at the moment).

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • ghee
  • 1 onion
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1/2 tsp chilli flakes
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp mustard seeds
  • 2 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp curry powder
  • 350g red lentils
  • 1 tin coconut milk (I used light)
  • 600ml vegetable stock
  • 150g spinach
  • 10g coriander leaves
  • salt and pepper

For the paneer

  • ghee
  • 200g paneer
  • 10 curry leaves
  • 1 tbsp mustard seeds

Method

1.) Peel and chop up the onion finely

2.) Melt 1 tbsp ghee in a frying pan and fry the onion until soft

3.) Peel and chop up the garlic and ginger

4.) Add the garlic, ginger, chilli flakes, cumin powder, mustard seeds, turmeric and curry powder and fry for a couple more minutes until fragrant.

5.) Make up the stock and weigh out the lentils. Add the onion mixture to the slow cooker, along with the stock and the lentils.

6.) Cook in the slow cooker for 2 hours on a high setting.

7.) Chop up the coriander and set to one side.

8.) 10 minutes before the dhal is done, add the coriander and spinach to the slow cooker.

9.) Chop up the paneer into cubes, heat 2 tbsp ghee in a frying pan.

10.) Add the paneer to the pan along with the curry leaves and mustard seeds.

11.) Fry until the paneer is golden brown, turning over.

12.) Put some kitchen roll on a plate and move the paneer onto it with a slotted spoon.

13.) Put another layer of kitchen roll on top and press to get rid of some excess oil.

14.) Stir the spinach through the dhal and serve with the crispy paneer.