Chickpea Curry

Recently I started watching the Andy Warhol documentary on Netflix as I am a fan of art even though I know very little about it. During Warhol’s life he was a very private person and no one knew much about him but after his death his diaries were found, edited and published (they’re winging their way to me as we speak). What I really loved in the first episode is that the editor of his diaries said that some of the people he had written about resented what he’d said about them but she said this diary is Warhol’s narrative, if you want to tell your own narrative, write your own diary. Other people can disagree with you, but they can’t invalidate your opinions, your feelings are your own. So, in summary, don’t piss me off because I can totally write about you here, it’s my narrative :P. The documentary uses David Bowie’s ‘Andy Warhol’ song to open which is quite funny because for one, Andy Warhol didn’t like David Bowie. Also, David Bowie did idolise Warhol but despite that, you could hardly call his song flattering with lyrics such as ‘Andy Warhol, looks a scream, hang him on my wall. Andy Warhol, Silver Screen, can’t tell them apart at all’.

Here is another chickpea curry recipe that I found on BBC Good Food. It did have eggs but I didn’t so it’s eggless but feel free to add eggs or whatever kind of protein you like.

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp ghee
  • 1 onion
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 3 cm ginger
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 450g tomatoes
  • 1 tin chickpeas
  • 200g spinach
  • 3 tbsp plain yoghurt
  • 1/2 tsp chilli flakes
  • 10g coriander leaves
  • rice to serve

Method

1.) Peel and finely chop the onion. Melt some ghee in a large pan and add the onion. Cook for 10 minutes until the onion is soft.

2.) Whilst this is cooking, put some rice in another pan with some boiling water and cook on a low heat. Peel and finely dice the garlic. Slice off the ginger skin and grate the ginger. Chop up the tomatoes.

3.) Add the garlic, ginger, spices, chilli flakes and tomatoes to the pan and fry for a couple of minutes.

4.) Drain the tin of chickpeas and add the chickpeas to the pan with 100ml water. Bring to a simmer, cover and cook for 25 minutes.

5.) Chop up the coriander leaves whilst this is cooking.

6.) Once this has finished, remove the lid and add the spinach, Cook for 3 more minutes until the leaves have wilted.

7.) Stir through the yoghurt and sprinkle over the coriander leaves. Serve with the rice.

Chickpea, Peanut Butter Curry

Unlike the baos, this is definitely a meal you can make on a weeknight. I can personally vouch for it being a satisfying post gym supper. The peanut butter and the chickpeas will fulfil all your protein needs. A much better idea than Brittany’s on the Apprentice – ‘alcoholic protein drinks’ The horror. The recipe was on BBC Good Food.

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • oil
  • 1 onion
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 2.5cm ginger
  • 1 tsp coriander
  • 2 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp fenugreek
  • 1 tin chickpeas
  • 300ml vegetable stock
  • 2 tbsp peanut butter (or almond butter)
  • 200g spinach
  • 150g rice

Method

1.) Put the rice on to cook

2.) Peel and dice the onion.

3.) Heat the oil and add the onion. Cook for 7 minutes.

4.) Whilst this is cooking, peel and dice the garlic. Peel and grate the ginger.

5.) In a small bowl, add all the spices with 2 tbsp water and stir to make a paste.

6.) Add the garlic and ginger to the onion and fry for one more minute.

7.) Add the paste to the pan and fry for 5 more minutes. Make up the stock.

8.) Stir in the chickpeas then add the stock. Cook for 5 minutes.

9.) Add the peanut butter and stir then add the spinach. Leave for a few minutes until the spinach is wilted.

10.) Serve with the rice.

Curry Sweetcorn Soup

This tasty soup is another recipe from ‘Gordon Ramsey’s Ultimate Cookery Course’ – I’m really smashing it this week but it’s another winner. Gordon uses a tin of creamed corn which I was assuming was some sort of old British staple like corned beef but the supermarket didn’t have it so I just used a normal tin of sweetcorn and added a bit of coconut cream (conveniently left over from when I made Urap Urap). I would serve this with a naan.

Serve 4

Ingredients

  • oil
  • 1 onion
  • 1 large potato
  • 1 litre stock
  • 3 x 200g tins sweetcorn
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 tbsp coriander seeds
  • 1 tbsp cumin seeds
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 tsp chilli flakes/powder
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 2 tsp ginger
  • 1/2 tsp salt

Method

1.) In a casserole pan, lightly toast the coriander and cumin seeds until fragrant. Move to a mortar and give them a mash with the pestle.

2.) Peel and dice the ginger and garlic, add them to the mortar and add the turmeric, salt and chilli. Mash everything together.

3.) Peel and finely chop the onion.

4.) Add some oil to the casserole dish and heat up. Add the onion and cook for about 5 minutes.

5.) Peel and chop the potato into chunks and open the tins of sweetcorn.

6.) Add the curry paste to the casserole dish and cook for another 2 minutes. Add some more oil if dry.

7.) Make up the stock.

8.) Add the potato and stir around in the casserole dish. Add the stock and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat then add the tins of sweetcorn, Simmer for about 15 minutes until the potato is cooked through.

9.) Add the coconut cream and stir to break it up. Blitz to a thick soup with an immersion blender.

Matar Paneer

Being fed up with never being able to find paneer in my local supermarket when I need it, I spotted some in M&S and bought a couple of packets just to use when I need it – it keeps a fair while. The M&S paneer is like a of squeaky cheese, a bit like halloumi that browns up really nicely and works well with this recipe. Some paneer you buy seems to have more of a feta-like texture. I really like this as a midweek meal, it’s not a curry you have to slow cook for hours and it’s difficult for me these days to have that sort of time now that gyms are open and I still have my language classes twice a week. I found the recipe on BBC good food which is a site I like as there are reviews from people that have already tried the recipe.

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1.5 tbsp ghee/sunflower oil
  • 225g paneer
  • 2.5cm piece ginger
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 green chilli
  • 250g passata
  • 150g frozen peas
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 200g spinach
  • coriander leaves to garnish
  • rice/naan to serve

Method

1.) Chop up the paneer into 1cm cubes

2.) Heat 1tbsp of the oil/ghee in a frying pan and add the paneer, fry until browning on the outside. Transfer the paneer to some kitchen roll and lightly press with kitchen roll to absorb excess oil.

3.) Peel and grate the ginger and finely chop the chilli. Heat the other half tablespoon of the ghee/oil in the pan and add the cumin, coriander, turmeric, ginger and chilli. Fry for 1 minute.

4.) Add the tomatoes and simmer for 5 minutes.

5.) Add the peas and cook until defrosted. Add the spinach and let it wilt.

6.) Add the paneer back to the pan, mix and cook for 1 minute.

7.) Sprinkle over the garam masala and serve with the rice/naan.

Katsu Curry

Technically I should call this recipe ‘karē raisu’ – curry over rice – katsu curry is a curry served with a fried, bread crumbed cutlet of chicken or pork and Katsu means victory in Japanese. Japanese curry is an Indian-Japanese fusion as a result of British colonialism – you’re welcome 😉

I travelled to Japan in March 2019 and though I sadly didn’t try Japanese curry whilst I was there, I have since visited the London branch of the chain Coco Ichibanya which holds some great photos of the food on the website if you like innuendos.

Japan is truly a beautiful country with so much to see. I spent two weeks there and visited Tokyo, Kyoto, Hiroshima and Osaka, stopping off at Nara and Miyajima. Parks, shrines, (including a shrine to cats!), cat cafes, shopping districts and a monkey park were just some of the things I covered. It was very taxing on the calves and there was still so much more I could have seen (and plan to). The jarred sake they sell at the local convenience stores was very welcomed of an evening after days full of hours on my feet! Speaking of convenience stores, you can buy fantastic food in the small 7/11 supermarkets and they’ll even heat it up for you. In terms of food, the Kyoto food market is absolutely first-rate and the Takoyaki served there have yet to be beaten.

Back to the topic at hand, I served this curry with roasted cauliflower – I didn’t want the extra dishes and the inevitable leftover ingredients of bread crumbed cauliflower for a mid-week meal. I used a Japanese curry block ‘Golden curry’ which are easily found in oriental supermarkets or failing that – Amazon.

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 cauliflower
  • 1 onion
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 thumb-nail sized chunk of ginger
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 large potato
  • 15g coriander
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1 tbsp golden curry
  • 300g rice
  • 1 litre water
  • 1 tbsp plain flour

Method

1.) Preheat the oven to 200 degrees C, line a baking tray

2.) Chop up the cauliflower into florets and put into the tray, spray with oil and sprinkle over salt.

3.) Whilst the oven preheats, get the rice ready. Put into a pan and cover with water. Turn on the hob.

4.) Peel the potato, carrot and onion and chop them up into small cubes.

5.) Sauté them in oil in a large frying pan until soft.

6.) Put the cauliflower in the oven and roast for around 25 minutes.

7.) In the meantime, peel the garlic and ginger and finely chop.

8.) Add to the pan and fry for another couple of minutes.

8.) Boil a litre of water.

9.) Add the garam masala and the turmeric for a couple of minutes.

10.) Mix the water with the japanese curry block

11.) Sprinkle the flour in the pan and cook off for 1 more minute

12.) Add the water and curry powder mix and simmer until the curry has a nice thick consistency.

13.) Chop up the coriander

13.) Combine the cauliflower with the curry sauce and sprinkle on the coriander.

14.) Serve with rice.

おいしい